Lifestyle

Men Of Substance – Men’s Health Week

Men Of Substance

Wow it’s been a hot minute since I have been on my blog, so I thought what better time than to start a new journey with a new blog post with the launch of my Men Of Substance Series! With this new venture I thought I would cover topics such as Men’s Health, Fashion, Hair, Music, Fitness and many more. From men of influence hitting every day topics for every day men.

I’ve really wanted to write about areas in men’s culture on how men deal with certain things such as mental health growing up in the 21st century, talking about fashion and hair styles and what they think of style! This is something that I’m really passionate about and can’t wait to start. Being in the industry myself I’m always looking for inspiration from other men and guys I look up too or even look at for creative inspiration & to just supporting each other (as its okay for men to support other men and to not feel “weird” about it).

I want it to be okay for men to talk about issues they have,  for men to be able to express themselves whether it’s through fashion or a creative outlet… So that being said here is my first blog post and I hope you guys like it!

My first topic is Men’s Health, last week was Men’s Health Week so I thought I would reach out to some good friends of mine in the Industry and ask some questions regarding men’s mental health and how they deal with certain things and what they had to say about the topic.

Mental health is very close to me as growing up with domestic violence as a child and how I have dealt with these things and what keeps me going through those tough times and dark thoughts and having a positive outlook on life.

I hope by writing about these types of topics it opens up the door to men that might not feel okay about talking about certain issues in their lives and be able to.

I reach out to several of my mates in the industry and asked them some questions and here is what they had to say.

 

Leeroy Elliott

 

What do you do when dealing with hard times as a male, do you normally speak out about it or with someone?

-I think as men, sometimes it’s difficult to talk about our emotions. We often expect ourselves and others to just ‘harden up and get on with it.’ I most certainly have been guilty of adopting this philosophy, especially working in the construction industry. But I have come to realise talking about your problems with someone you trust can really help. Just having someone listen can help relieve the stress and often give a different perspective on the matter.

What is something you do to keep a positive mind:

-I’m a strong believer in healthy body, healthy mind so I like to try to stay fit and active which in turn helps me keep a positive mind.

Any tips and tricks with dealing with haters/pessimistic people:

-It’s easy for people to just say ignore them but the truth is you probably wont or can’t. So just focus on all the positives and your own self-worth. Surround yourself with positive and optimistic people.

If someone was to reach out what are some words of wisdom you would have to share:

-The most important thing to realise is that no matter how tough or difficult things seem to be these times will pass and you can get through it.

How do you think we can break the barriers of mental health issues with men to make it more approachable to chat about:

-Mental health seems to be a taboo topic especially with men so we really need to bring it to the forefront and talk about it as much as possible and not shut it away. Making sure that men dealing with mental health issues know they are not alone and they do not have to go through it alone.

 

Saint Luke

 

What do you do when dealt with hard times as a male, do you normal speak out about it or with someone?

-It really depends what has happened or what is happening in my life. Most of the time I normally keep things to myself and deal with it as time goes. I find listening to music and physical activity helps a lot. The other is speaking out to my mum on certain hard times.

What is something you do to keep a positive mind:

– I feel I spend a lot of time with young kids like my nieces and nephew. I find kids bring joy and happiness to the world. Also going for a run, gym, friends and family.

Any tips and tricks with dealing with haters/pessimistic people:

– My parents have also told myself and my siblings that there will be people in this world that will judge and comment on thing about you. Always stay true to who you are and be proud of what you have achieved and not let these negative people stop you from what you are doing. Instead use it to your advantage and show them how strong you are.

If someone was to reach out what are some words of wisdom you would have to share:

– It depends on what they are reaching out about, I feel always listening first and asking some questions to get them to really open up and explain what they are truly feeling and go from there. I find using past experience and what you strongly believe can help and being supportive and positive.

How do you think we can break the barriers of mental health issues with men to make it more approachable to chat about:

– I think always having a strong support network and make sure that they know that you are always there for them no matter what even just to listen or even a simple hug, text or call can make a difference.

 

Charles Oliver

 

What do you do when dealt with hard times as a male, do you normal speak out about it or with someone?

-When dealing with hard times I always feel it is best to speak out about the problem. I normally talk with my partner, or parents where I can get advice and have someone guide me through.

What is something you do to keep a positive mind:

-To keep positive I think it’s good to keep busy so your brain doesn’t overthink things, if I have free time I always scope out new music, work out or just head out for a walk down the beach.

Any tips and tricks with dealing with haters/pessimistic people:

-I think it’s easier to say haters gonna hate but it can be tough, I think the best thing to do is take what people say with a pinch of salt and surround yourself with the people you love most.

If someone was to reach out what are some words of wisdom you would have to share:

-Follow your dreams, be yourself. Anything is possible if you work hard to achieve your goals.

How do you think we can break the barriers of mental health issues with men to make it more approachable to chat about:

-By encouraging more people to open up via this ^^ I think a lot of people don’t realise probably about 90% of the world’s population suffer with issues and no one ever talks about it.

 

Josh Heuston

 

What do you do when dealt with hard times as a male, do you normal speak out about it or with someone?

-Typically when I went through hard times i used to bottle it up and just dwell on it, however recently I’ve started speaking to friends/ family about it. You’d be surprised how open people are to listening to you, or are going through similar things.

What is something you do to keep a positive mind:

-Exercise and meditation! Without them i’d explode.

Any tips and tricks with dealing with haters/pessimistic people:

-I try to look at negative people like that from a different perspective, for people to write something hateful to someone they’ve never met they must be going through something pretty heavy in their own life. Ignore it.

If someone was to reach out what are some words of wisdom you would have to share:

-Take a breath, exercise and don’t take life too seriously have fun with it.

How do you think we can break the barriers of mental health issues with men to make it more approachable to chat about:

-By speaking about it more often! There isn’t anything to be ashamed of, men have emotions just like women. The more we speak about it the quicker the “taboo” or stigma  around men’s mental health.

 

Mr. Jordan Turner

 

-“We have a lot of challenges to fight when it comes to mental health. Breaking the confines of the masculine culture is the biggest to me. The idea of acting a certain way, being a certain person, not expressing how you are actually feeling, just because society says so is something we can end just by lending an ear.

Don’t choose to ignore it by creating a wall of silence. I feel as though we think that’s the easier way, but even asking “how was that for you,” is just as easy. “How can I support you right now,” is just as easy. Expressing how we feel raises weights off our shoulders so we should help our friends to do the same. And the best part is we can all start the conversation.”

Jono Castano Acero

What do you do when dealt with hard times as a male, do you normal speak out about it or with someone?

-I do, I’m lucky to have a fiancé that’s understanding and a good listener. She breaks down the problems and let’s me see the positivity out of every situation. I think it’s important to let your problems out before it kills you inside.

What is something you do to keep a positive mind:

-I try to see the good in every situation and don’t let the minor things affect me. Not everyday is a great day and that’s totally fine because tomorrow is a new day.

Any tips and tricks with dealing with haters/pessimistic people:

-Know that their hateful/negative outlook is not because of you. Their dealing with something themselves.

If someone was to reach out what are some words of wisdom you would have to share:

-Be authentic, be yourself. Not everyone is going to love what you believe in or what you’re about but just know that there are people who do and that’s all that matters.

How do you think we can break the barriers of mental health issues with men to make it more approachable to chat about:

-If more people spoke out about it to their mates then it wouldn’t be such an ignored subject. We should all encourage each other to speak out or to ask how our mates are going.

 

 

Statistics 

By Beyond Blue

Men are at least three times more likely to die by suicide than women.

Breakdown: In the period 2010-2016, males were three times more likely to die by suicide than females.  1 In 2016, 2,151 (75%) people who died by suicide were male and 715 (25%) were female. 2

Every day in Australia,  almost six men die by suicide.

Breakdown: The  2151 male suicides in Australia in 2016 is the equivalent of  5.9 every day.

The number of men who die by suicide in Australia is nearly three times the number who die in all types of road accidents combined.

867 males died in transport accidents in Australia in 2015 3 which is 37% of the 2,292 who died by suicide.

Death by suicide among Australian males is equivalent to more than 77,581 years of potential life lost.

Men lost 77,581 years of potential life because they died prematurely by suicide in.4

Evidence indicates men are far less likely to seek help for mental health conditions than women.

The 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing study found that in the previous year, only 27.5% of males with a mental disorder and recent symptoms had accessed services for their mental health problems compared with 40.7% of females.5 Estimating treatment rates for mental disorders in Australia, Whiteford et al (2014) indicated that treatment rates had increased significantly in recent years but did not provide a gender breakdown.

One in eight Australian men will experience depression in their lifetime.

12.2% of Australian males aged 16 to 85 have experienced an affective disorder over their lifetime.6 * This is equivalent to at least 1.15 million males today.^

One in five Australian men will experience an anxiety condition in their lifetime.

20.4% of Australian males aged 16 to 85 have experienced an anxiety disorder over their liftime.7** This is equivalent to at least 1.93 million males today.

One in seven Australian men experiences depression or anxiety or both in any year.

13.3% of Australian men aged 16 to 85 have experienced an anxiety and/or affective disorder in the past 12 months.8 This is equivalent to at least 1.26 million Australian men today. Note: the percentage of Australians who have lifetime experience of anxiety and/or an affective disorder is unknown.

Men are less likely than females to experience depression and/or anxiety.

12.2% of Australian males aged 16 to 85 have experienced an affective disorder in their lifetime compared to 17.8% of females. 20.4% of Australian males aged 16 to 85 have experienced an anxiety disorder in their lifetime compared to 32% of females.9

Men are less likely than females to be currently experiencing depression and/or anxiety.

5.3% of Australian males aged 16 to 85 have experienced an affective disorder in the last 12 months compared to 7.1% of females. 10.8% of Australian males aged 16 to 85 have experienced an affective disorder in the past 12 months compared to 17.9% of females.10

* An affective disorder is defined by the ABS in this research as one or more of the following: depressive episode, dysthymia and bipolar affective disorder.

^ This figure, and all current population figures in this section, has been calculated by extrapolating the current Australian male 16-85 year-old population from 3101.0 ABS Australian Demographic Statistics as of 30 June 2016. The population figure, which is 9,484,939, has then been multiplied by the rate in ABS National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007 (2008)

** An anxiety disorder is defined by the ABS in this research as one or more of the following: panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

Where to get help

If you are interested in seeking some advice about your mental health, a good first step may be to see your doctor, a psychologist or a counsellor. There are also many excellent organisations you can contact for help.

If you are having a personal crisis:

If you want general mental health support and information:

  • MensLine Australia (online counselling and forum for men) – call 1300 78 99 78.
  • Dads In Distress (peer support for separated dads) – 02 6652 8113
  • SANE Australia (people living with a mental illness) – call 1800 18 7263 or chat online

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